MCM and ICM Math Modeling Competitions
At the University of Colorado at Denver
2009 Contest Dates
February TBA to February TBA, 2009
See Gary Olson for more information

Year
Participant
Participant
Participant
Faculty Advisor
Problem
Designation
Final Paper and Link
Invited Conferences
2008
Joeseph Cavalleri
Gary Linley
Lee Rosenberg
Gary Olson

Successful Participant

SIAM Rocky Mountain Regional
2007
Christine Lee
Igor Molkov
Megaqn Sawyer
Gary Olson
Organ Transplant
Honorable Mention
Organ Transplant System
MAA Rocky Mountain Regional
2007
Daniel Cavanaugh
Nicholas Nassimbene
Andrew Shaffer
Gary Olson
Airplane Seating
MERITORIOUS
Airplane Modeling
MAA Rocky Mountain Regional
2007
Derlin Campbell
Lee Rosenberg
Lydie Van Holland
Lance Lana
Airplane Seating
MERITORIOUS
Airplane Boarding Model
SIAM & MAA Rocky Mountain Regional
2006
Leah Grant
Michael Morrison
Jeremy Noe
Gary Olson
Sprinkler Systems
MERITORIOUS
Analysis and Optimization of Hand Moved Sprinkler Systems
SIAM Rocky Mountain Regional
2005
Darren Homrighausen
Christine Lee
Leah Grant
Lynn Bennethum
Non-Renewable Resources
Honorable Mention
Modeling the Depletion of the Ozone Layer

2005
Matt Kaspari
Barry O'Reilly
Jeremy Noe
Michael Jacobson
Tollbooths
Honorable Mention
Relieving Toll Booth Congestion
SIAM Rocky Mountain Regional
2005
Matthew Burman
Kurt Cordle
Jon Stranske
Lynn Bennethum
Tollbooths
Honorable Mention
An Optimization Analysis of Toll Booth Queuing
SIAM Rocky Mountain Regional
2004
Matt Kaspari
Will Mitchell
Sarah Williams
Bill Briggs
To Be Secure or Not To Be
Successful Participant
Network Security

2004
Michael Nichols
Barry O'Reilly

Bill Briggs
 Quick Pass Problem
Successful Participant






















The Mathematical Contest in Modeling and Interdisciplinary Contest in Modeling are international competitions sponsored by COMAP that ask teams of up to three undergraduates to spend a weekend modeling an applied mathematics problem.

In the MCM, teams receive short descriptions of two open-ended problems. One of the problems has a continuous flavor (e.g. engineering, differential equations, or physics) and the other has a discrete flavor (e.g. computer science, graph theory, or combinatorics). Teams choose one of the two problems to work on, and may use any inanimate aids (books, computers, reserach papers, etc.). Their job is to scope the problem, develop a model, apply their model, and analyze their model in a complete report. They have only 96 hours to do this - approximately 6pm on a Thursday until 6pm the next Monday.

In the ICM, teams receive a short description of a single interdisciplinary problem which eflects a quantitative situation in mathematics, operations research, systems engineering, security (industrial, information, or physical), and resource and environmental protection and management.  Again, they may use any inanimate aids as they spend their weekend scoping their problem, developing a model, applying their model, analyzing their model and writing a complete report. This contest takes place during the same weekend in early February.

Here is a page of resources compiled by Dr. Mark Parker from Carroll College. Check out the problems page if you are interested in looking over the problems from previous years. Also, check out Carroll College professor Dr. Kelly Cline's Guide to the MCM, for a past Outstanding Winner's Perspective on the MCM competition.

Each year, COMAP designates the top 1 - 2% of all papers as Outstanding Winner, the next 15% or so are designated Meritorious and the remainder of the top 50% are designated Honorable Mention. Those teams that survived the weekend with a viable product comprise the next 50% - Successful Participant.


Adapted from Carroll College MCM/ICM Web Page